Health care job placement, tennessee medical jobs and healthcare job search

THE WORLD IS CHANGING RAPIDLY, SO ARE HEALTH CARE CAREERS


Home
About Us
Our Sponsors
Careers
Education
Employers
Labor Market Info
Important Links
Downloads
Contact Us

Speech Language Pathology Aide and Assistant  (Rehabilitation Professions)

DID YOU KNOW?   (click for more)


DESCRIPTION OF WORK:
Speech-language pathology aides (and speech-language pathology assistants -SLPAs) are support personnel who, following academic and/or on-the-job training, perform tasks prescribed, directed, and supervised by ASHA-certified speech-language pathologists. See Speech Language Pathologist for the specific activities that the speech language pathology assistant or aide might assist with.

There are typically two levels of support personnel – aides and assistants. Based on level of training, these support personnel may have a different scope of responsibilities in the work setting. Aides, for example, have a different, usually narrower, training base and a more limited scope of responsibilities than speech-language pathology assistants. Different terminology may be used to refer to support personnel in speech-language pathology (e.g., communication aides, paraprofessionals, service extenders). Mean annual salary for this position is $26,640.


WHERE EMPLOYED:
Speech-language pathology aides (and speech-language pathology assistants -SLPAs) may be employed anywhere that employs speech pathologists. About one-half of jobs for speech language pathologists and audiologists were in preschools, elementary and secondary schools, or colleges and universities. Others were in offices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists, hopsitals, offices of physicians, speech, language, and hearing centers, home health agencies, or other facilities.


PERSONAL QUALIFICATIONS:
Speech language pathology aides (and assistants) usually work at a desk or table in clean, comfortable surroundings. The job is not physically demanding but does require attention to detail and intense concentration. The emotional needs of clients and their families may be demanding. Most full-time speech language pathologist aides (and assistants) work about 40 hours per week, though some work part time. Those who who work on a contract basis may spend a substantial amount of time traveling between facilities.


ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) recommends completion of an associate`s degree from a technical training program with a program of study designed to prepare the student to be a speech-language pathology aide or assistant. Because the requirements for speech-language pathology support personnel vary across the country, persons interested in serving as speech-language pathology assistants should check with the state of intended employment for that state’s specific requirements. State agencies (licensure boards) currently regulating support personnel have training requirements that range from a high school diploma to a baccalaureate degree + graduate credit hours, as well as a variety of differing requirements for those supervising these individuals. In addition to state regulatory agencies, state education agencies may credential support personnel to work solely in schools to support service delivery provided by a qualified speech-language pathologist.


EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS:
As of September 2003, ASHA is aware of 27 operational associate degree programs for speech-language pathology assistants and 73 institutions that are considering and/or developing programs. Some of these programs are exploring training opportunities through distance learning and collaborations between community colleges and institutions of higher education. For a self-identified list of SLPA training programs, contact slpa@asha.org .

Educational program types for this career.


EMPLOYERS:
Potential employers for this career.


LAST UPDATED:
9/9/2007 - Update
Current status - Active


HomeAbout UsOur SponsorsCareersEducation
EmployersLabor Market InfoImportant LinksDownloadsContact Us